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Is Las Vegas really in the picture for the Raiders?

Caesar's Palace pool

The Raiders to Vegas rumors seem to still be in play, and frankly it makes sense.

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Mike Shanahan discusses RGIII

Is Mike Shanahan trying to rehabilitate his image by speaking up now about Robert Griffin III?

Shanahan has plenty to answer for, as many of us felt he committed coaching malpractice by letting RGIII take a beating as they implemented the read-option in RGIII’s first season. In many ways that season was a smashing success, but there was a price to pay with those injuries.

Of course, the real story is more complicated, and frankly Shanahan has been giving some pretty candid interviews about what happened.

Shanahan defends what they did with the read-option, pointing out that they took advantage of what RGIII did best. Ok, that’s a fair point. Yet he tries to argue that RGIII’s injuries came from more traditional QB plays as opposed to designed runs. That may be true, but the real reason for the injuries had to do with RGIII’s poor judgement about when to slide. Shanahan addresses this, comparing RGIII to Russell Wilson who has been brilliant using his judgement on when to run and when to slide:

And Wilson doesn’t care how many yards he gets. He gets as many yards as he can, and then he falls to the ground. You will never see him get hit running the read-option, or very seldom, because he knows when to give it, when to keep it, when to slide, and that’s what quarterbacks who run the read-option have to do. He knows there is nothing more important than him staying healthy. For all these analysts that say, oh, you can’t run it because you take too many hits, well, that was true about Robert. Robert did take too many hits. One thing I didn’t do a very good job of is trying to emphasize to him that you can’t take a hit; you’ve gotta slide, you are too valuable. But was hard for him, because that’s not what he did in college. He was such a good athlete, and he was used to being faster and quicker and sometimes bigger. But in the NFL, these guys all can run and they all can hit, so you have to give yourself up. He was very competitive, and he didn’t want to do that.

Shanahan’s admission here that he didn’t do a good enough job teaching RGIII when to avoid contact tells the real story. The success of the read-option only reinforced RGIII’s willingness to take chances, and it was in this context that Shanahan let things get out of control.

Shanahan’s larger point is that judicious use of the read-option can be a huge advantage, and that argument is persuasive. He points to RGIII’s initial success, the success of Russell Wilson, and the success of Colin Kaepernick before he and Jim Harbaugh made the mistake of focusing way to much on pocket throws.

The question now is how will RGIII do in Cleveland with Hue Jackson. Shanahan likes that Jackson is very flexible and he thinks Jackson will use some read-option principles to take advantage of what RGIII does best. But he seems to put way to much emphasis on RGIII not being able to do much from the pocket. It’s hard to imagine RGIII being effective without making at least some progress on that front.

The good news with Jackson is that he focuses much more on play-action and deep throws to stretch the field, as opposed to the complex West Coast Offense employed by Shanahan and Jay Gruden in Washington. One can argue that the West Coast Offense was the worst fit for RGII, and he may have a better chance to succeed in a more vertical passing game that takes advantage of his strong arm.

We’ll see how this goes.

Cam Newton, Paul George And Bryce Harper Do Nothing In New Gatorade Videos

recover-gatorade-cam-newton

Much like Seinfeld was a show about nothing, the new Gatorade “Recover Time” videos feature your favorite athletes doing nothing – which is when recovery happens.

The Gatorade campaign initially kicked-off in December 2015 to remind athletes that if it’s not game time, it’s recover time.

Gatorade Recover protein bars, shakes and powders have the right amount of carbs and high-quality protein to refuel exhausted bodies and help bring muscles back to life

“It’s Recover Time” is a compilation of recovery routines for Cam Newton, Paul George and Bryce Harper:

“Sleep” features MLB MVP, Bryce Harper, quietly recovering:

“Play” features Pacers’ Paul George recovering as he battles his teammate Joe Young in video games:

Peyton Manning officially retires

Not surprisingly, Peyton Manning retired today with a classy speech.

Peyton has always been a class act, and of course is among the best quarterbacks ever to play the game. Fans and loudmouth pundits can debate where he should be on the all-time list of best quarterbacks, but at least he’s in the argument.

He rides out with a Super Bowl victory. It wasn’t his best game, but many wrote him off this season and he ends up winning the Super Bowl in one of the most improbable comebacks in history.

Powerful take by Jay Williams on marijuana and pain

The NFL, NBA and MLB need to get rid of their idiotic bans on marijuana for their players.

Check out this video and article from Jay Williams who describes how he became addicted to prescription drugs after his motorcycle accident.

Marijuana is a much better option for pain management because it’s much less addictive (if at all) than prescription drugs.

I’d love to see the NBA start by lifting their ban.

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